Last edited by Dusho
Sunday, August 9, 2020 | History

8 edition of Lambert Simnel and the Battle of Stoke found in the catalog.

Lambert Simnel and the Battle of Stoke

by Bennett, Michael J.

  • 140 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by St. Martin"s Press in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Great Britain
    • Subjects:
    • Simnel, Lambert.,
    • Stoke, Battle of, England, 1487.,
    • Impostors and imposture -- Great Britain -- Biography.,
    • Great Britain -- History -- Henry VII, 1485-1509.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementMichael Bennett
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDA330.8.S55 B46 1987
      The Physical Object
      Paginationvii, 157 p. :
      Number of Pages157
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2385722M
      ISBN 100312012136
      LC Control Number87014666

        The Lambert Simnel Rebellion. Citation: C N Trueman "The Lambert Simnel Rebellion" Henry was prepared for Lincoln and the two armies met just outside of Newark at East Stoke on June 16 th Lincoln’s army stood at 8, while Henry could call on 12, men. The battle lasted for three hours. In the initial stages Lincoln’s force. Lambert Simnel, Scullion and Falconer According to Vergil’s account of the Battle of Stoke, following the defeat of the Yorkist army: Young Lambert the pretender was taken, together with his tutor Richard, but the lives of the both of them were spared, because the former was innocent and, thanks to his youth, had done no wrong, as being.

      Look at other dictionaries: Stoke-on-Trent — City and Unitary Authority area City of Stoke on Trent Stoke on Trent Wikipedia. Stoke Golding — is a village and civil parish in the Hinckley and Bosworth district of Leicestershire, England, about three miles north west of Hinckley. According to the census it had a population of 1, It has an impressive Saxon church .   The young prisoner became a servant in Henry VII’s kitchen under the name of ‘Lambert Simnel’. Meanwhile, the official Earl of Warwick remained in the Tower. In he was condemned to death, to clear the path for the projected marriage of Henry VII’s son, Arthur, Prince of Wales, to the Spanish princess, Catherine of Aragon.

      impostor Lambert Simnel, who was crowned king in Dublin but defeated at the battle of Stoke in , and pardoned by Henry VII. This story can be recognised in Francis Bacon's influential history of Henry's reign, published in , where Lambert first impersonated Richard, Duke of York, the younger son ofFile Size: KB. Lambert Simnel and the Battle of Stoke by Bennett, Michael Book The Fast Free See more like this Michael Rupert "MAIL" Brian Stokes Mitchell (Debut) Musical FLOP Flyer $


Share this book
You might also like
Unemployment update, July 1987.

Unemployment update, July 1987.

apprentices.

apprentices.

Not the End of the World

Not the End of the World

Physiological Aspects of the Liquor Problems

Physiological Aspects of the Liquor Problems

Appropriating Australian folk dance into sacred dance

Appropriating Australian folk dance into sacred dance

Undercover Angel Strikes Again

Undercover Angel Strikes Again

The ships register

The ships register

Abdul Kalam

Abdul Kalam

[Bill in aid of commerce of North Pacific coast, by construction of canal and locks at Cascades of Columbia River.]

[Bill in aid of commerce of North Pacific coast, by construction of canal and locks at Cascades of Columbia River.]

Social Development in Young Children

Social Development in Young Children

History of the old Cheraws

History of the old Cheraws

Lambert Simnel and the Battle of Stoke by Bennett, Michael J. Download PDF EPUB FB2

The rebellion and resulting battle of Stoke are very well covered. Just less than a couple of years after Bosworth, this was a test for Henry VII. He crushed the rebel army which helped to cement the Tudor I had to read this book to learn about Lambert Simnel.4/5.

"Lambert Simmel and the Battle of Stoke" by Michael Bennett outlines the story of a pretender to the English throne in the 15th century and the battle that he fought for it.

I think this book does a great job of over viewing the conflict leading up to the battle, including the War Lambert Simnel and the Battle of Stoke book the Roses and Henry VII's relationship with the Yorks after Cited by: This book probes the mysteries surrounding Simnel, raises new questions about his identity and charts the history of the rebellion ending at the battle of Stoke.

Rating: (not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

That is why Lambert Simnel was crowned as Edward VI; his cousin, one of the princes in the Tower, had been Edward V, but was now dead.] Anyway the book is a fine tour through the period in general and the conspiracy in particular. The section on the battle of Stoke Field is brief, but then so was the battle.

The maps aren't up to much either/5(8). Lambert Simnel and the Battle of Stoke by Bennett, Michael J. (Michael John), Publication date Topics Simnel, Lambert, Stoke, Battle of, England,Impostors and imposture Borrow this book to access EPUB and PDF files.

IN COLLECTIONS. Books to Borrow. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive : Lambert Simnel and the Battle of Stoke. All of our paper waste is recycled within the UK and turned into corrugated cardboard.

Book Binding:N/A. World of Books USA was founded in Lambert Simnel, Simnel also spelled Symnell, (born c. —died ?), impostor and claimant to the English crown, the son of an Oxford joiner, who was a pawn in the conspiracies to restore the Yorkist line after the victory of Henry VII ().

A young Oxford priest, Richard Symonds, seeing in the handsome boy some alleged resemblance to Edward IV, determined to exploit him.

THE BATTLE OF EAST STOKE M. Bishop. Nottinghamshire County Council, 18 pages. 75p. LAMBERT SIMNEL AND THE BATTLE OF STOKE. Michael Bennett. Alan Sutton Publishing Ltd., Gloucester, pages. £ The quincentenary of the Battle of Stoke-by-Newark has been commemorated by a full length study by Dr Michael.

The Paperback of the Lambert Simnel and the Battle of Stoke by Michael J. Bennett at Barnes & Noble. FREE Shipping on $35 or more.

B&N Outlet Membership Educators Gift Cards Stores & Events HelpPages: settlement of Simnel’s claim. In Lambert Simnel issue was settled in the Battle of Stoke (June ); Lincoln was killed, Simnel and Symonds were taken, the other Yorkist leaders disappeared.

Symonds was kept in prison, but Henry VII displayed only sardonic contempt for Simnel, whom he recognized to have been a harmless dupe.

The most detailed account of Simnel and the Yorkist conspiracy that tried to overthrow Henry Tudor is Michael Bennett’s Lambert Simnel and the Battle of Stoke, published in Dr. Bennett traces the story of the ten year old boy, son of an Oxford tradesman, who was coached by an ambitious priest to impersonate the Earl of Warwick.

Lambert Simnel and the Battle of Stoke by Michael J. Bennett. Palgrave Macmillan, Hardcover. As New. Disclaimer:An apparently unread copy in perfect condition. Dust cover is intact; pages are clean and are not marred by notes or folds of any kind.

At ThriftBooks, our motto is: Read More, Spend jacket quality is not guaranteed. Lambert Simnel and the Battle of Stoke by Bennett, Michael. Sutton Publishing. Used - Very Good. Great condition for a used book. Minimal wear. Lambert Simnel PART 2 – Supporters and Enemies 6. Lincoln, Lovell and Yorkists in England 7.

The ‘Diabolicall Duches’ 8. The Earl of Kildare and the Irish Contingent 9. Henry VII and John Morton PART 3 – – Evidence from England Burgundian Preparations The Reign of the Dublin King The Battle of Stoke Field 4/5(32).

The Battle of Stoke Field was the decisive engagement in an attempt by leading Yorkists to unseat him in favour of the pretender Lambert Simnel. Though it is often portrayed as almost a coda to the major battles between York and Lancaster, it was fought between well-equipped armies of comparable size.

Book review: “Lambert Simnel and the Battle of Stoke” by Michael Bennett by Rebecca Henderson Palmer on Febru Michael Bennett’s work is a supreme achievement when it comes to better understanding the early years of Henry VII’s reign, a period typically given short shrift by most historians.

Lambert Simnel and the Battle of Stoke by Bennett, Michael and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at The last major engagement of the Wars of the Roses took place at the Battle of Stoke Field, near the town Newark in Nottinghamshire.

Although the Yorkist King Richard III had been killed at the Battle of Bosworth two years earlier, the victorious Lancastrian King Henry VII’s grip on the crown remained somewhat tenuous.

Seeking to reverse the outcome of Bosworth was the Yorkist. Among those captured after the battle was Simnel. Recognizing that the boy was a pawn in the Yorkist scheme, Henry pardoned Simnel and gave him a job in the royal kitchens.

The Battle of Stoke Field effectively ended the Wars of the Roses securing Henry's throne and the new Tudor dynasty. The battle of Stoke (16 June ) was the last battle of the Wars of the Roses and saw Henry VII defeat the pretender Lambert Simnel and his allies.

After the battle of Bosworth (22 August ) a few die-hard Yorkists refused to accept that their cause was dead. Their big problem was the lack of a suitable heir.Lambert Simnel and the Battle of Stoke. Lambert Simnel and the Battle of Stoke. Request an Image. first edition by Bennett, Michael.

St. Martin's Press, First edition, first printing. Fine in fine dust jacket, in mylar cover. (Inventory #: Embry ) $ 00 add to cart Available from Hermitage Book Shop. Add to Wishlist; Ask a.Stoke, battle of, Lambert Simnel, posing as Edward, earl of Warwick, son of the duke of Clarence and nephew to Edward IV, raised support in Ireland and was crowned in Dublin as Edward VI.

He landed near Lancaster and was supported by the earl of forces met with those of Henry VII at Stoke, near Newark, on 16 June.